Warner Bros. spending big for Wizard of Oz anniversary

Bert Lahr as the Cowardly Lion, Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow, Judy Garland as Dorothy, and Jack Haley as the Tin Woodman, sing in this scene from "The Wizard of Oz," distributed by Warner Bros. Photo: Associated Press/HO/Warner Bros

Studio bosses at Warner Bros. are planning a huge $25 million extravaganza to celebrate the 75th anniversary of The Wizard of Oz.

The family favorite was released on 25 August 1939, and to mark its latest milestone, executives will release the movie in 3D next month. It will actually become the first film to screen at the renovated Chinese Theatre in Hollywood.

The celebration will also include a line of Happy Meal figures at fast food giant McDonald’s throughout September and October, and special DVD box sets will also hit the market.

The film, starring Judy Garland as a teenage farm girl who finds herself lost in the fantasy world of Oz, was nominated for six Oscars following its release.

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